On Thursday, I shall vote for the little people.

I shall vote for the people of Greece, whose democratically elected government’s attempt to resist German-inspired austerity was squashed by the EU. I shall vote for them twice over, because the Greek people then rejected, in a referendum, what the EU was offering – only to have still harsher terms imposed on them a few days later against their will and despite what they had expressly rejected at the ballot box.

GREECE-POLITICS-ECONOMY-DEMO
Greeks protest in the run up to their referendum in which 61% voted against EU bailout terms – only to see harsher terms imposed on them regardless. (Photo credit should read LOUISA GOULIAMAKI/AFP/Getty Images)

I shall vote for the people of France, who voted in a referendum against the proposed EU Constitutional Treaty in 2005, but who later discovered that many of the proposals they had thought they were vetoing were incorporated into the Treaty of Lisbon later, regardless.

I shall vote for the people of the Netherlands, who discovered exactly the same as the people of France after their referendum on the same issue.

I shall vote for the people of Italy, who had an unelected former European Commissioner Mario Monti imposed on them as prime minister in 2011, despite him never having been elected to anything, ever, least of all in Italy.

I shall vote for the people of Ireland, who on two separate occasions held referendums which gave the “wrong” result from the EU’s perspective… and so had to have a re-run to get the “right” answer.

I shall vote for the weakest members of our society in the UK, who, as social justice campaigner and Labour MP Frank Field argues in the Church Times, deserve better than the EU can ever give them.

I shall vote for the poorest of African farmers, who as Anglican vicar Giles Fraser has said in The Guardian, are priced out of world markets by the EU.

I shall vote for refugees, on whose behalf the internationally-acclaimed relief organisation  Médecins Sans Frontières has taken a stand and stopped receiving EU funding in protest at EU handling of the refugee crisis.

I shall vote for workers, whose interests across the EU have been subjugated to those of bankers, as the economist Larry Elliott has argued in the Guardian here.

I shall vote for the little people, the ordinary people, whose voices cry out in frustration against the mighty power of the politicians, bankers, corporations, bureaucrats and commissioners – and yet whose voices are over-ridden.

On Thursday, unless anyone can convince me otherwise, I shall vote to leave an EU which, even with the pressure of a UK referendum, offered little by way of genuine reform.

On Thursday, I shall vote to leave an EU which, when its will is defied by the “ordinary” little people in votes, has again and again demonstrated what lies in its heart by choosing to ignore or circumvent them.

On Thursday, unless anyone can convince me otherwise, I shall vote to leave.


head and shoulders

Like all posts on this blog, this contribution is anonymous, so it can be read for what it says, and evaluated on its contents, rather than who wrote it.

See also: 10 problems with EU democracy in 30 seconds: https://knotsuntangled.wordpress.com/2016/06/11/eu-democracy-problem/

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